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Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
're cleaner than europe is right now. >> right. >> so we haven't felt it. my main worry is the following, that if the republicans and democrats can't get together to solve the fiscal cliff you will need an external force, a major market sell-off, you will need a major economic trauma to get them to poex. >> other things have been on the table. i want to talk to our viewers about a few of those as soon as we come back. coming up next, republicans want a new formula for inflation. it's called chained cpi. not a bad idea overall but it could slow the payments to social security recipients. the president has said he could agree to it but democrat lawmakers say no way. [ male announcer ] it's simple physics... a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inf
are you able to do so well in europe compared to america? is that just an example of you weren't disciplined in europe and you got a lot of business? i'm trying to understand. europe is harder right now than america. >> exactly. that underscores the point that what we do nobody else can do. we want to make the offer when your wallet is out of your pocket not six months after you leave the store. you can go look in the filing cabinet that oracle or s.a.p. or microsoft has and that's the 20th century. we're all about doing things in realtime. we make you that offer when your wallet is out and your credit card is in your hand. nobody else can do that. that's a universal big data realtime problem that only tibco can solve. >> you mentioned oracle and s.a.p. and analysts that i checked in with say that ibm has come on very strong. >> ibm is our strongest competitor. we beat them every single time in terms of technical performance. they do have strong relationships and at the end of the day we have to be three years ahead of the competition and we believe we are. >> okay. you had 25
of energy to europe. >> putin was speaking in brussels, where he has been holding talks with eu leaders. his first visit after he was reelected. although russia and the you are close trading partners, there are various contentious issues which divide them. >> vladimir putin did not waste any time on arrival -- just a quick way that the cameras. outside, protesters clashed with police. the women's rights activists were not mincing words, telling the president to go to help -- go to hell. inside, the eu message to russia was also clear. >> we will discuss commitments to guarantee our citizens democratic rights. >> the biggest disagreement is over energy issues. the eu has been critical of new gas pipelines from russia. the south stream pipeline is meant to carry russian gas through bulgaria to austria and italy, but the u.s. and russia are arguing over the rules to be applied to the new pipeline. >> it is true that some difference remained regarding some aspects of energy relations between europe and russia. >> european demands for russia to separate gas companies and distribution channels hav
market will carry into the new year. and, then there's europe. major headlines on the region's debt crisis have been noticeably few. and that has traders spooked. still, some market pros are upbeat about the outlook for stocks next year. >> our year-end target for 2013 is 1,525 to 1,575, that's our range for the s&p 500. if you look at it from current levels, you tack on a couple of percent for dividends, so it will be another good year. >> reporter: a good year for stocks next year perhaps. but, 2012 isn't over yet. and, there are fresh worries there may be more selling in the next few days, as investors look to lock in at least some of this year's profits. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: 'tis the season for procrastination, but don't worry, there are still three full shopping days left until christmas. and what better time to get started than tomorrow. it's expected to be the busiest shopping day of the year and the best prices so far. during the last weekend before christmas, retailers are marking down merchandise by as much as 70% and they'll be pulling out all the
anyone else. central europe last year, budapest, the czech republic had gone from a leading country in central europe, leading the region in laws and in the constitution of equality 16 years ago to a complete reversal today. it's got one of the worst records today of the deprivation of rights of women, roma people, jews, and lgbt people. sound familiar, that grouping? i was not prepared for what i was going to find in budapest. i was not prepared for the thousands ofneo nazis and state sanctioned militia that would meet a couple hundred marchers, thousands of them. * there was one young man, 21 years old, young hungarian, who would be the only person to go on tv with me, only hungarian, malan would take a blow horn and walk through the streets against families that hated us, and he walked and he shouted and he kept the morale up as we were walking against this sea of people who didn't like us because we were representing the inclusion and diversity that we so much cherish here. he was inspired by the story of my uncle and he said to me, do you think this is how harvey felt? and i sa
. onion lots of people, officials here and in europe, it relied on local folk sources. -- and the whole issue of how the united states became motivated to get involved is interesting. you know, again, i go back to the issue of intelligence and what people did know about would be and what assumptions people are making. it seemed like washington, everybody had a different idea of what should be done, and there were advocates on both sides, are ready group of individuals who wanted to up look for an opportunity to implement irresponsible protect some area that would succeed. so that is the whole section. this section again as to the how we came to intervene and why that was actually good idea. the next question, of course, is the one everyone is talking about now on which will leave more for questions. where is libya headed next. you know, i think with regard to what happened in and gusty, it is still -- i think everyone needs to take, regardless of all the chaos that is happening, step back, go up several thousand feet and looked at this process over a much longer not the time. we are sti
on saturday. and tropics, expect afternoon rainshowers and thunderstorms to continue to pop up as well. europe, specifically here into the balkans and turkey. been watching a very strong storm system. i want to show you some video out of instanbul. snowfall coming down here, causing headaches for traffic locally in the area. also seeing people really just attempt to clean up the mess from the road crews and this looks like the snow has been falling for the last several days. now starting to clear up and then unfortunately monday to tuesday, the next weather system is going to develop out italy. push off toward the east there. and there you see more rough weather. let's take a look farther toward the west toward the british isles, a storm system throughout the weekend. widespread rain, about 60 millimeters of rain in a few areas, not to mention gale force winds. that continues to push through. temperatures remaining to the low teens in london and paris, not the case off toward the east, take a look at moscow and kiev, minus 13 and minus 10 on saturday. here is a look at the extended forecast. >
revealed in the reaction of the markets here in america and in europe. people know the recession could follow if they do not do a deal, and that is why he is trying to get one. >> thank you very much for joining us. there is still no deal yet, but as the economic crisis has shown, 2012 will not be known as the year of political unity in washington. it may come as a surprise, but some of the nation's leaders have been immortalized in a work of art. "the network" is a video installation done by an artist. i went to the national portrait gallery where it is on display. >> 4, 3, 2, 1. [applause] >> washington's elite gathering for the first glimpse of themselves in a video portrait that enshrines them in art and history. >> lo and behold, we get this gift. and 89 americans were chosen by the artist to represent contemporary leadership. some are less recognizable than others, but all our leaders in their field. the results -- a constantly changing snapshot of power. >> within the realm of contemporary arts, it needs to be at the table for conversations about politics and policy. what i am r
berlusconi said he will try to replace him. >> on early exit for one of europe's most respected leaders. mario monti resigned months before the end of his term. he handed his resignation to italy's president shortly after the lower house of parliament approved his one-yearlong government. >> my words will be with every probability the last act and the last words before those who where i formerly hand in my resignation to the head of state. thank you very much to allow me to conclude with you this difficult but fascinating 13 months. >> monti announced he will resign after the people of freedom party. >> in less than two weeks of dialect, we have already gained five percentage points. so i hope we can aim for the 40% that could give us the victory. monti's future is still unclear. will he go back to being an economist or endorse parties that pledge to continue with his plan, reform. the former prime minister is expected to reveal his choice during a press conference on sunday morning. >> we expect mario monty to expect the decision over his future. that's where we will learn that friday
in the '80s that has been revised. if you go to canada or europe, it's very common there, even on the east coast it's very common to. and they have gotten much better machines so you can now put a machine like that in front of the store. >> is that at whole foods at 4th street? >> no, it's at the safeway at 4th street and one at clement and 7th, safeway and one i believe at the marina safeway. >> are they being used? >> yes, they are. >> they are kind of limited, again, if someone comes up with a shopping cart it kind of shuts it down, but for the family or for folks, that is kind of the small-scale solution. that if we get the prices of those down, they are a little expensive at the moment. that could provide convenience in a lot of neighborhoods. and then you would need that distribution system to collect it. i think we do have some solutions. >> director dick-endrizzi? >> just to make sure that commissioner ortiz-cartagena, if the supermarket isn't there and then the small businesses in that half-mile radiuss, they are not required to participate in the program. it's just when th
in all over north america and europe and africa and really we have got wishes coming in from almost every country in the world now. and people are just expressing, all kinds of amazing hopes and dreams for the future of the world which is really encouraging for us. we create the tree as a symbol of the global unity and hope. and we are going to continue to add wishes to the tree all through the month of december. so we would love for you to go to our website which is rainbow fund.org and it is free and we will printout your wish on a piece of paper and fold it into a crane and put it up on the tree. now, i want to thank, some key people who helped with this year's tree. first i want to start off with our core team, our core creative team and that consists of karin kai and linda mihara and thank you they have been working on the tree for seven years. >> and this year we have the help of dozens of volunteers and i want to particularly acknowledge the university of berkeley alfa, fi omega service community and volunteers from one brick. aid for good, the san francisco chapter. and you guys a
the highest economic and security interests in the asia pacific region. not in europe as has been for 100 years prior to that, than the asia pacific region. secondly, that we would maintain freedom of access throughout that region. in particular, we would maintain the sea lanes in that area, whatever the challenge might be. even as we reduce our defense budget, therefore we must maintain and would maintain a powerful navy, and that that navy would be charged with maintaining the freedom of those sea lanes. we had, of course, to be concerned as to whether there would be a challenge for that. we observed that the rise and shine has more energy needs for more energy than they can produce themselves, and to maintain the economic growth which they believe is essential. we observed that the south china sea is a potential source of energy supplies for china and that there is a contention among the nations in that region as to where the ownership and rights of access are to the south china sea. and this is conceivable that china might seek to reestablish its claim there by military coercion and t
breakthroughs of the enlightenment both in europe and in scotland and apply them in many ways to american politics. self-government was only going to work in jefferson's mind if the people who were governing themselves knew themselves, cared about each other -- because why would you sacrifice for someone with whom you had no common interest, and you would find that your individual rights, your individual being had come from nature or from god and, therefore, could not be taken away by the hand of a king or the hands of a mob. and this is the moment he defines, he embodies. it's a remarkable moment. it was blissed to be alive in that very hour, humanly important. so here you have jefferson who can kill a fly when he needs to and can think in the most fundamental, far-reaching ways when he needs to. one hell of a combination. one hell of a combination. what i wanted to do in revisiting jefferson, obviously, was try to restore him to his context as a politician. partly because i think politics gets too bad a rap these days. it may deserve a semi-bad rap. i don't want to be overly optimistic
on our day every day. >> even by. >> we can't keep borrowing ore we'll be like europe. this is not a classroom exercise. look at wuper and see what happens if we continue down the path that. is a place we don't want to g. >> the budget director puts the bilk on medicare and medicaid and social security. >> they will drive federal spending up faster than our economy can grow . revenues will not keep up . so we have a problem. if you don't have enough revenues to pay for the spending, you have to borrow and on the track that we are on. if we go on doing who what is in the law over the next several decades. our public debt will rise faster than our economy can grow. when that maps, you have to pay interest on the debt and cretors can see your debt rising faster than your economy is growing and they charge more and more. it is a very bad situation. >> author brooks finds currentidates current debates misguided. >> it is simple as a family that does that. right now, you have a situation in which the government in its over speppeding ways tries to rationalize it by saying th
of europe and the european union to designate hezbollah as a terrorist organization and so forth. the presiding officer: is there objection to proceeding to the measure? without objection. mr. reid: the ask the senate proceed to a voice vote on the adochghts resolution. -- on the adoption of the resolution. the presiding officer: is there further debate? if not, all in favor say aye. those opposed say no. the ayes appear to have it. the ayes have it. the resolution is adopted. mr. reid: thanks, mr. president. i ask further that the preamble be agreed to, the motion to reconsider be considered made and laid on the table, that there be no intervening action or debate and that any statements related to this matter appear in the record at the appropriate place as if given. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the senate proceed to h.r. 1845. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: h.r. 1845, an act to provide a demonstration project providing medicare coverage and so forth. the presiding officer: is there any objection to procee
away by high water pressure on the fourth floor of the hotel he was staying in. nowhere in europe had he experienced that. this technology was doing something to support the life and the growth of the city. philadelphia, throughout the 19th century, was the major industrial city of the united states. all of these industries used water from this system. and it served as a prototype for many american cities, including pittsburgh and new york. man: new york city went to philadelphia and said, "you know, we're thinking of developing a hudson river water supply -- what do you suggest we do?" and they said, "we've had "a lot of problems on the schuylkill. "don't go to the hudson river. go to the upland and work by gravity." and that's what new york city did. they first went to the hudson highlands, but 150 years later, it went to the delaware highlands. and really diverted the water that normally went to philadelphia to new york city. i don't think they anticipated that. narrator: the majority of new york city's drinking water comes from watersheds in upstate new york. a watershed is the ar
cold snap sweeping across eastern europe. freezing temperatures there have claimed more than 200 lives. ukraine has been hardest hit. it has been snowing there for weeks. at least 80 people have died in crane, most of them homeless. in britain it's the rain. devon in divest england is one of the areas deluged by storms. what about the weather across the u.s. in the next couple of days? the holiday travel season is now under way, and aaa expects more than 93 million americans to be on the move at some point most of them by car. jeff beradelli at our miami station wfor joins us. the next couple of days could affect travelers, could affect shoppers. what kind of weather are we going to see across the country? >> reporter: jirnlg it's nainl good news. it's pretty quiet across most of the united states right now with the exception of the west coast. we have a big storm slamming into there. tomorrow is going to be pretty quiet also across the united states so travelers shouldn't have too much to worry about. as we head into christmas eve, a small storm in the northeast, and maybe eventually
their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has reinforced the less than that one of the most effective ways to address long-term security challenges is to help build the capabilities of our allies. we have seen its approach with our counterinsurgency campaigns in iraq and afghanistan and our counter-terrorism efforts in yemen and somalia. we are expanding our security force assistance to a wider range of partners, in order to address a broader range of security challenges. in the asia-pacific, the middle east, and europe, africa, and latin america 3 to implement this area of strategy, the services are retaining the security cooperation capabilities we have honed over a decade of war and making investments in regional expertise. for example, for the army's new regionally aligned for grade a g brigade structure, they are able to engage on a regionally aligned brigade structure, they are able to engage on a rotational basis. to cut through the bureacracy and red tape to provide assistance. i visited countr
on the battlefield. two of them were captured in europe, when north africa, and there were transported into harm's way, not out of harm's way. so there's a danger to the detainees, one entirely of the government's conduct a detainee's making. instead, the hardest part of this and the claim that you hear repeated the most often include about my colleague is that the real reason why judicial review in that context does not make sense is because it poses a threat to military operation, a threat that the courts will actively interfere with military operations and that the courts should not do that. let me be clear, a point that if that threat were provable, that's interference were there it would be a serious problem. we now have four years of jurisprudence and the d.c. courts involving guantanamo detainees were the government had this very same argument about the extent to which judicial review would interfere with military operations, interfere with the ability of the government to conduct the war and terrorism in the to do with intelligence gathering. for the most part there's been a suggestion t
cliff fallback plan fails. mr. president of europe. it's your turn o lead. >> the president and congress take action, tax rates will go up on every american taxpayer and devastating defense cuts will go into effect in ten days. how we et their god only knows. lou: chief economist joining us with perspectives on what is next forthe markets, the ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] they are a glowing example of what it means to be the best. and at this special time of year, they shine even brighter. come to the winter event and get the mercedes-benz you've always wished for, now for an exceptional price. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease a 2013 glk350 for $399 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. can i still ship a gift in time r christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. by december 22nd yep, there i am with flo hoo-hoo! watch it! [chuckles] anyhoo, 3 million people switched to me last year, saving an average of $475. [sigh] it feels good to
. the fiscal cliff fallback plan fails. mr. president of europe. 's your turn to lead. >> the president and congress take acon, tax rates will go up on every american taxpayer and devastating defense cuts will go into effect in ten days. how we get their god only knows. lou: chief economist joining us with perspectives o what is next for the markets, the economy, and the country. ♪ lou: ten days until the fiscal clef. that's right. still counting. the market sell-off today on no solution and moody's chief economist and bedford of adviser and chairman ceo harvey eisen will join us in moments to make all of this rational and understandable. first, and the "moneyline," investors expressed disappointment in the republican failure to pass plan be by selling stocks of around the world. certainly adding to the drama today, a day in which four kinds of options expire, and that is expected a quadruple preaching day, plunging on the open, fighting its way back, ending with a loss of 121 points. that sounds lousy, but it is better than it had been. the s&p down just over 13, nasdaq a little more
cliff fallback plan fails. mr. president of europe. it's your turn to lead. >> the president and congress take action, tax rates will go up on every american taxpayer and devastating defense cuts will go into effect in ten days. how we get their god only knows. lou: chief economist joining us with perspectives on what is next for the markets, the ♪ any tree on this lot is on m i'm the messenger, by the way. what's your name? joanne. with the hundreds that i save with progressive on my car insurance, this tree is on me. no way. way. this tree is on me. really?! yes. aah! let me just trim it up a little bit for you. [ buzzing ] thank you. saving's greetings. you guys are gonna get this tree right here? are you sure that's the one? il tie it to the roof for you. make savings a new holiday tradition. ♪ ♪ lou: ten days until the fiscal clef. that's right. still conting. the market sell-off today on no solution and moody's chief economist and bedford of adviser and chairman ceo harvey eisen will join us in moments to make all of this rational and understandable. first, and th
. the fiscal cliff fallback plan fails. mr. president of europe. it's your turn to lead. >> the president and congress take action, tax rates will go up on every american taxpayer and devastating defense cuts will go into effect in ten days. how we get their god only knows. lou: chief economist joining us with perspectives on what is next for the markets, the economy, and the country. ♪ this family used capil one venture miles to come home for the holidays. that's double miles you can actually use... sadly, their brother's white christmas just got "blked out." brother ] but it's the family party! really jingles your bells, doesn't it? my gift to you! the capital one venture card! for any flight, any time! that's doue mis u can tually use! how illuminating. what's in your walt? let me guess, am on the naughty list again? ho ho ho! let me guess, am on the naughty list again? you know it can be hard to lbreathe, and how that feels. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. by keeping my airways spiriva helps control my copd symptoms open f 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups. s
't really control. i think what the u.s. and europe do and international financial institutions do is going to matter. morsi really cared about what the international community thinks about him. the brotherhood is very sensitive to that because they need outside support to get their economy back on track. so there is a real point of leverage there. so that -- if we can use that then i might actually be a little bit more optimistic. and but in terms of what the long-term goal is, izz -- islamists are islamists for a reason. they aren't going to become liberals. all this nice talk about post islamism is not realistic because we're talking about deeply religious conservative societies where large majorities admittedly don't vote on the basis of siria but they are sympathetic to the role of sharia and life. and democracy can empower those elements of society that can push society further tore the right and that's not just egypt we see that in other democracies whether in hungary, israel. it's not a unique thing today. islamist doss want to have a more islamically infused egypt and that is somet
and the army family especially being over in europe. give love to daddy. he misses him. this hardest part s being the mommy and the daddy. >> merry christmas! >> how is everybody doing? >> all right. here today to receive a couple of care packages. we have ones that were packed by our rfg. they were packed especially for you. it is a by name box. we were talking about some stuff and people were saying that america has kind of foregotten about the war that has been going on for more than ten years now. for most people that is not true because you have is complete stranges and, of course, mr. chuck norris and soldier's angels who took the time out of their day and their own pocket to send you a care package. >> let you know how big he is getting even though i'm not there. like you can tell by how he does stuff. >> hi, babe. i just want to say i love you and i can't wait for you to come home. i miss you so much. >> hey, babe, have a good day. see you soon. not too much longer and you will be home. love you. bye, babe. >> i would do anything for them. and that is one -- that is pretty much my m
're closing in on europe with blinding speed. and consequences are reduced growth and reduced well-being. that is what the conversation ought to be ou neil: to that santa analogy, one thing very clear to me, we live in a societ where entitlements are just expected, the gifts are just expected, the free bys are just expected. web sites logged on to see how many benefits you're eligible for, that are expected. i'm notsaying there are not genuinely needy deserving folks in this country. we're more about what we get than what we can control. you know?t control. >> you know, neil, the other thing is, that the santa implication is that congress is just doling this stuff out. ie, nobody has to produce it. neil: that's right. >> nobody has to pay any taxes. it all comes from somebody and they don't really want to face that issue. neil: no, they don't. it is about personal responsibility at the end of the day that is really what the fight is about. are people responsible for their oww lives or are we entitled to what somedy else produces? that is the issue. neil: want to stick a pole, north
, the governmental dysfunction of europe without the excuse of being separate countries. and you know, i think it's a serious challenge to america's standing in the world that the views of credit car mets an-- markets. and washington is not faking it yet with sufficiency seriousness. >> i just add, not in a partisan way, that the 213 shall 215 to 2089-- 209 vote last night in the house before the whole thing came apart which was to not take the sequestration funds out, let's take them out of domestic spending, a party-line vote. 20 -- democrats stuck on that. not a single one broke. and i think you are seeing far more unity in the democratic ranks than in the republican ranks right now. i agree it is a governmental problem. if the whole thing comes grinding to a halt and we see it reflected in the financial markets and the stock market an elsewhere, then it's a governmental problem. it's not simply a democratic advantage or republican advantage. but right now the real fault lines are in the republican caucus. >> rooney: we-- . >> woodruff: sounds like none of us knows where this is head. so let's
of europe in 1848 was in flames about whether or not they were going to have democracies or monarchies. and the world didn't know yet whether or not democracy was simply another name for chaos. and the coherence of a people's government which is what he saying in the gettysburg address was an important thing to prove, not just that we could create a government of the people, but that it could endure a terrible test. and i think that he felt that to have the war end without slavery being eliminated -- >> once and for all, not just with the emancipation proclamation-- >> -- had once and for all, right. >> -- but by the constitution. >> right, and i think that you see how important that was to him and that he tried to and succeeded in getting the house to pass it, at the same to keep his party which was enormously, it's the like democratic party today, it's blue dog democrats, there were sort of blue dog republicans. half the republican party was conservative and weren't sure that they liked, they were anti-slavery but they believed in sort of gradual emancipation over they, thought that
girl people who voted the second pass system in europe. in this case, i do not think because there's a high percentage of children living in aberdeen that that means are ready to save the people well enough. we should have issues like increasing the minimum wage because that is affecting every single young person's employment. thank you. [applause] >> how about a young person from the southeast? to a quick click [inaudible] concerts that raised young person is important. from scotland, northern ireland, west of england by transport. however this is a lingering issue. we have tried again and again to try and make cheese and make transport cheaper, but we have moved issues different because we know this is the people. as young people we have to make this a national issue, not just one year after year. this is the year of change. 2013 is coming. we can't have the same issues. it's not supposed to be fair on everyone. so i beg you, let's try something different. [applause] >> how about the female speaker from the northwest? anybody from the northwest? yes. >> whatever we do, i try to t
importantly, i think particularly in europe, where they are being forced, many countries, to tighten a lot -- to have a lot of tax increases and spending cuts, a lot of austerity. the u.s. was seen as the kind of great hope for growth in the advanced world and in the rich world. so if the u.s. has its own excessive austerity in the short term, that -- that's a real problem for a world economy growing too slowly. >> there's so much on the table right now. must everything be done at once? or -- you say -- it seems they're taking steps too small. there is no overall tax reform. there is no agreement on the debt limit. how does that -- how does that play out? is it better to have more all at once or to take baby steps? >> interesting. the most important thing is to avoid doing absolutely nothing. because that's what gets you the kind of massive tax cuts -- tax increases and spending cuts. you don't want stalemate. but in terms of the deal itself, there is a paradox. what you might call a minimalist deal. for example, an agreement only to extend tax cuts for the middle class. that's the kind of
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)

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